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Nanobrücken 2017

Nanobrücken 2017 | Hysitron, Inc.

Nanobrücken 2017:
European Nanomechanical Testing Conference and Hysitron User Meeting

Hosted by the University of Manchester in cooperation with Hysitron, Inc.

View the Nanobrücken 2017 Schedule

View the Nanobrücken 2017 Program

Date
April 4th - 6th, 2017

Workshop & User Meeting Venue
Alan Turing Building (#46), University of Manchester
Manchester, M13 9PL, United Kingdom

MAP

Tutorial Session Venue
ICAM Seminar Room, Pariser Building (#12), University of Manchester
Manchester, M13 9PL, United Kingdom

MAP


Nanobrücken 2017: European Nanomechanical Testing Conference and Hysitron User Meeting will take place April 4th - 6th, 2017 at the University of Manchester in Manchester, United Kingdom. This will be the 7th edition of the Nanobrücken series and combines oral presentations from leading European research groups with practical workshops/tutorials and a poster competition. The conference is open to all aspects of nanomechanical and nanotribological testing, including biomechanical, in-situ experimentation and theory/simulation.

2017 brings some exciting changes to the Nanobrücken conference:

  1. A move across the channel to the historic University of Manchester
  2. Tutorial session on Experimental Nanoindentation presented by Steve Bull
  3. An opportunity to have samples tested onsite with Hysitron's latest instrumentation

Keynote Speaker

Prof. Trevor Page is an Emeritus Professor and Senior Researcher at Newcastle University.

Presentation Title:
What Has Nanoindentation Done For Materials?
The Power, Potential, Pitfalls and Pleasures of Instrumented Indentation

Abstract:
For over 30 years, continuously-recording instrumented indentation techniques (IIT or ‘nanoindentation’) have enabled the exploration of the mechanical responses of solids at spatial resolutions that previous generations of researchers have only dreamed of!  But, the tag of ‘hardness tester’, the challenges of instrument calibration and attempts to calculate the contact stress fields under indenters of imprecisely-known shapes, may have impeded exploration of the full gambit of materials studies which have beckoned.

Coupled with parallel microstructural observations of the damage resulting from controlled contact experiments, IIT studies have proved a powerful means of investigating the fundamentals of deformation mechanics, deformation transitions, scale effects and energy dissipation mechanisms in small solid volumes. Moreover, this remains one of the few ways of measuring, understanding and modelling the behaviour of the small volumes of material critical to many modern technologies, especially where conventional macroscopic data does not adequately describe materials properties to underpin component design and life-timing.

In crystalline solids, nanoindentation has allowed us to study elastic-plastic transitions, dislocation and crack nucleation and confirm the long-suspected pressure-induced phase transformations governing room-temperature plastic deformation in silicon and germanium. This has reactivated fundamental interests in how the balance of deformation modes is controlled in solids, how defect nucleation works, even when such defects subsequently lie inactive until later service and scale effects. Sadly, there appear to have been fewer investigations of how these initial deformation sub-structures and defects either further develop, or interact with each other and real microstructures.

By contrast, in thin-surface-engineered systems, much of our modelling of the synergies occurring between coating and substrate, together with our understanding of life-time limiting coating cracking and interfacial adhesive failure, have their origins in instrumented indentation studies. This has largely arisen because of our ability to make controlled experiments over a range of scales spanning the coating thickness.

To fulfil the potential of providing quantitative evidence of materials properties and behaviour unobtainable in other ways, much more is still possible. This is not to pretend that such studies will be easy; they will invariably rely on further ‘in-depth’ analysis of experimental outcomes (in terms of load-displacement characteristics and deformation substructures) rather than using these instruments as ‘blind, black box, information gatherers’. However, for the tenacious, almost the whole canon of our conventional descriptions of mechanical property control in physical metallurgy and materials science is open for such detailed studies. The rewards will be enormous.

Invited Speakers

Prof. Yu-Lung Chiu is a Lecturer in the School of Metallurgy and Materials at the University of Birmingham.

Presentation Title:
Crystal Plasticity Study via Nanomechanical Mechanical Testing

Abstract:
Nanomechanical testing in electron microscopes brings extra advantages to the study of dislocation mediated crystal plasticity in that specific region/feature of interest could be quantitatively characterised with the real-time imaging capability. This talk will summarise our recent studies on the plastic deformation behaviour of metals including titanium and magnesium alloys using pico-indenter systems on both SEM and TEM. The effect of sample size, orientation on the yield strength will be discussed based on the results obtained from micro-pillar samples of different internal structures. The real-time images of dislocation initiation observed will be discussed, together with the pitfalls that encountered on in-situ nanomechanical testing in electron microscopes.

 

Prof. Beverley J. Inkson is Professor of Nanostructured Materials at University of Sheffield, Director of the Sheffield NanoLAB/RCUK Basic Technology program in Nanorobotics and Chair of the UK NanoFIB network.

Presentation Title:
Understanding the Interaction of Micro/Nano-mechanical Testing and Surface Localized Ion Implantation

Abstract:
Outstanding progress in the understanding of micro- and nano-mechanics over the last 10 years has come from the implementation of the synergistic triad of nano-indentation systems (mechanics), electron microscopes (imaging/spectroscopy) and ion microscopes (specimen nanofabrication/tomography). Here we will look at how the use of focused ion beams (FIB) can modify the structure of investigated specimens, and alter surface mechanical properties measured by nano-indentation type testing. Illustrative examples will include gallium modification of metallic alloys, lubrication of surfaces, and crack modification during tomography. Upcoming opportunities with the new generation of gas-ion FIBs will be discussed.

Prof. Christoph Kirchlechner is a Professor in Structure and Nano-/Micromechanics of Materials at Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH.

Presentation Title:
Using Nano- and Micromechanics to Understand Interface Plasticity

Abstract:
Nano- and micromechanical testing on focused ion beam (FIB) milled pillars is frequently used to study size effects in materials. It also allows for isolating the effect of individual interfaces, like grain- or phase-boundaries on the strength, which nowadays gives us a unique tool for justifying and quantifying well-established material models for various dislocation slip transfer mechanisms. Our current work focusses on slip transfer mechanisms and its dependence on (i) grain boundary (GB) type, (ii) loading direction and (iii) atomistic structure at the interface. In situ methods are applied to investigate the transfer from individual dislocations through the GB (via TEM), the collective storage (via µLaue diffraction) and collective transmission behavior (via SEM). In the talk, we comprehensively present results on slip transfer in various copper bi-crystals. Three different GB types, all made from copper, will be presented and discussed: (i) High Angle GBs (HAGBs) acting as strong obstacle for dislocation slip transfer; (ii) HAGBs allowing for easy slip transfer and (iii) coherent Σ3 twin-boundaries. The experimentally findings will be compared to well-established models and to recent MD simulations.

Prof. Jon Molina-Aldareguia currently leads the research group of Nanomechanics and Micromechanics of Advanced Materials at IMDEA Materiales Institute.

Presentation Title:
Micro and Nanomechanical Testing as a Useful Tool to Enable Fast and Efficient Design of Structural Materials

Abstract:
Nanoindentation and other related micro and nanomechanical testing techniques have been the subject of extensive research in the last twenty years. Much of the work up to date has focused on utilizing these techniques to unravel mechanical size effects at the micro and nanoscales. However, testing at the microscale offers other benefits, including fast material development routines, as the amount of material required for testing is reduced, and the possibility of measuring the individual constituents in complex microstructures, so that this information can be utilize to inform microstructurally based multiscale material models, thus facilitating virtual testing strategies towards a fast and robust computational materials engineering approach. The Experimental Micro and Nanomechanics group at IMDEA Materials Institute leads a number of research projects in this direction. Fulfilling our objectives require a full understanding of the consequences of testing miniaturized samples, so that macroscopillay relevant data can be obtained, as well as further development of the techniques, to measure at different ambient conditions, such as high temperature, to measure closer to the real operation conditions. Examples of this strategy in a number of technologically relevant materials, such as Mg alloys, Ni superalloys and TiAl intermetallics will be presented.

Prof. Michelle L. Oyen is a Reader in Bioengineering in the Mechanics, Materials and Design Division and is a member of the Biomechanics research group at the Department of Engineering at the University of Cambridge.

Presentation Title:
Poroelastic Properties of Stimuli-responsive Cryogel Scaffolds

Abstract:
Cartilage is a structural tissue with unique mechanical properties deriving from its electrically-charged porous structure. Here, cartilage-mimicking materials are fabricated using polyelectrolyte hydrogels based on polyvinyl alcohol and polyacrylic acid. The mechanical response, as measured via indentation, of physically-crosslinked cryogels are compared to those of heat-treated chemical gels made from the same polymers, as a result of pH-dependent swelling.  Indentation measurements are analyzed within a poroelastic framework to decouple elastic modulus and fluid flow response.  In contrast to the heat-treated chemically-crosslinked gels, the elastic modulus of the physical cryogels was found to increase with charge activation and swelling. The permeability of both materials to fluid flow was impaired by the presence of electric charges. This cartilage-like mechanical behavior displayed by responsive cryogels can be reproduced in other polyelectrolyte hydrogel systems to fabricate biomimetic cellular scaffolds for the repair of the tissue.

Call for Abstracts

In addition to Keynote, Invited, and Contributed Talks, there will be a Student Talk Competition open to anyone who is a student at the time of the conference, and a Poster Competition open to everyone.

Please use this Abstract Template to submit your abstract to nanobruecken@gmail.com with ABSTRACT in the subject line. Be sure to indicate your preference for Talk, Student Talk, or Poster as directed in the template.

No longer accepting abstracts.

The conference prefers that you use your own laptop computer. However, bringing a backup of your presentation file on a memory stick is recommended.

Posters should be prepared in A0 portrait format; stands and pins will be provided.

Conference Events

AM: Tutorial session
PM: Welcome, student talks, poster session and keynote

AM: Hysitron Users Meeting, hosted lunch
PM: Oral and poster sessions, conference banquet dinner

AM: Oral sessions continued
PM: Demo session at University of Manchester facilities

Please contact Will Williams and Ude Hangen to arrange for demo sessions.
Sessions can also be arranged for Friday the 7th

Nanobrücken Tutorial

The cost of the tutorial is £25. Coffee and lunch will be provided.

Registration is Closed - Tutorial Session is Full

Program Committee

Dr. Etienne Bousser, University of Manchester (United Kingdom)

Prof. Brian Derby, University of Manchester (United Kingdom)

Prof. Phil Withers, University of Manchester (United Kingdom)

Dr. Will Williams, University of Manchester (United Kingdom)

Dr. Ude Hangen, Hysitron, Inc. (Germany)

Dr. Douglas Stauffer, Hysitron, Inc. (United States)

Prof. Eduard Arzt, Leibniz Institute for New Materials (Germany)

Prof. Roland Bennewitz, Leibniz Institute for New Materials (Germany)

Thomas Wyrobek, Hysitron, Inc. (United States)

Dr. Oden Warren, Hysitron, Inc. (United States)

Dr. Rhys Jones, Hysitron, Inc. (United Kingdom)

Davor Krusevljanin, Hysitron, Inc. (Germany)

Registration & Payment

Registration is closed.

Please pay for the conference by clicking the secure PayPal link below for you registration category. If you prefer to pay via ACH transfer or credit card over the phone, please contact Luba Glukh at Hysitron by phone at +1-952-835-6366.

No PayPal account is necessary, to pay by debit or credit card, click the "Pay with Debit or Credit Card" button.

Conference Banquet Dinner

The conference banquet dinner will be held at The Lowry in the Compass Room on Wednesday, April 5th at 19:00.

The Lowry
Lowry Outlet, Pier 8, The Quays
Salford M50 3AZ

Getting there...

By Bus - Walk to Oxford Road (2-3 mins). Take #53 to 'The Quays at MediaCityUK', North Bound from Oxford Road - Stop is Near University Shopping/Precinct Centre. Get off at the 'Lowry Car Park' stop. Journey approx. 20-30 mins depending on traffic

By Tram - Walk to St. Peters Square Tram Stop (15mins). Take Tram D to MediaCityUK. Get off at MediaCityUK stop (end of the line). The Lowry is across the Bridge to the South. Journey approx. 35 mins

Return Tram to St. Peters Square (central Manchester) - Last Tram (Tram E) from MediaCityUK stop is 23:40 mins.

Journey Planner

Hotel Accommodations

The following hotels are located within walking distance of the Alan Turing building:

ibis Manchester Centre Princess Street
Charles Street, Manchester City Centre
Manchester, M1 7DG, United Kingdom
TEL: +44 0161 2725010

Holiday Inn Express Manchester CC - Oxford Road
2-4 Oxford Road
Manchester, M1 5QA, United Kingdom
TEL: +44 8432 083005

Malmaison Hotel Manchester
1-3 Piccadilly
Manchester, M1 1LZ, United Kingdom
TEL: +44 0161 6411883

Inquires/Contacts

Send inquires to nanobruecken@gmail.com or contact a Local Committee member.

Please contact Will Williams and Ude Hangen to arrange for demo sessions.
Sessions can also be arranged for Friday the 7th

Host/Sponsor Websites

University of Manchester          Hysitron, Inc.          Bruker

Previous Nanobrücken Workshops

Nanobrücken 2016 - Nanomechanical Testing Workshop and Hysitron User Meeting
March 2-4, 2016
Saarbrücken, Germany

The INM - Leibniz Institute for New Materials and Hysitron, Inc. was pleased to present Nanobrücken 2016: A Nanomechanical Testing Workshop and Hysitron User Meeting.

This was the 6th edition of the now-annual Nanobrücken workshop series, held thus far at INM Saarbrücken in 2010, 2012, and 2014, and TU Dresden and Fraunhofer IZFP Dresden in 2013.

As in the past, the workshop was open to all aspects of nanomechanical and nanotribological testing, including biomechanical, in-situ experimentation and theory/simulation.

View the Program

Nanobrücken 2015 - Nanomechanical Testing Workshop and Hysitron User Meeting
April 21-23, 2015
Potsdam, Germany

The Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces and Hysitron, Inc. was pleased to present Nanobrücken 2015: A Nanomechanical Testing Workshop and Hysitron User Meeting.

This was the 5th edition of the now-annual Nanobrücken workshop series, held thus far at INM Saarbrücken in 2010, 2012, and 2014, and TU Dresden and Fraunhofer IZFP Dresden in 2013.

As in the past, the workshop was open to all aspects of nanomechanical and nanotribological testing, including biomechanical, in-situ experimentation and theory/simulation.

View the Program

Nanobrücken 2014 - Nanomechanical Testing Workshop and Hysitron User Meeting
March 26-28, 2014
Saarbrücken, Germany

INM - Leibniz Institute for New Materials and Hysitron, Inc. was pleased to present Nanobrücken 2014: A Nanomechanical Testing Workshop & Hysitron User Meeting.

This was the 4th edition of the now-annual Nanobrücken workshop series, held thus far at INM Saarbrücken in 2010 and 2012, and TU Dresden and Fraunhofer IZFP Dresden in 2013.

As in the past, the workshop was open to all aspects of nanomechanical and nanotribological testing, including in-situ experimentation and theory/simulation.

View the Program

Nanobrücken 2013 - Nanomechanical Testing Workshop and Hysitron User Meeting
March 20-22, 2013
Dresden, Germany

The Dresden Fraunhofer Cluster Nanoanalysis (DFCNA), the Dresden Center for
Nanoanalysis (DCN) of TU Dresden, and Hysitron, Inc. was pleased to jointly present
Nanobrücken-Dresden: A Nanomechanical Testing Workshop & Hysitron User Meeting.

This was the third workshop in the now-annual Nanobrücken workshop series, the first two
having been held at INM Saarbrücken in 2010 and 2012.

The main theme of this workshop was nanomechanical testing applied to advanced materials and
semiconductor devices. However, this workshop had contributions covering many
aspects of nanomechanical research including in-situ experimentation (mainly in
transmission electron microscopes) and theory/simulation.

View the Program

Nanobrücken 2012 - Nanomechanical Testing Workshop and Hysitron User Meeting
March 22-23, 2012
INM Saarbrücken, Germany

Nanobrücken 2012 was jointly presented by INM – Leibniz‐Institute for New Materials in Saarbrücken and Hysitron, Inc., with co‐sponsorship from the JEOL company. The user meeting took place on the morning of Thursday, March 22, and the workshop began after the conclusion of the user meeting and continued until the afternoon of Friday, March 23.

This workshop aimed to highlight the very latest in nanomechanics and nanotribology research, including the use of complementary techniques, such as in-situ observation in electron microscopes, simultaneous electrical characterization, superimposed dynamic testing, acoustic emission monitoring, and more. The workshop sought to cover a broad range of materials and structures, as well as the influence of temperature and other environmental conditions, and was also open to computational contributions.

View the Program

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